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BENEFITS FROM CANADA REVENUE AGENCY

 

If you or someone in your family qualify for disability benefits, you may be entitled to:

  1. Get Tax Refund – upto $20,000
  2. Get Child Tax Disability Supplement – upto $22,000
  3. Open an account in the disabled person’s name and get:
    • Grant – upto $70,000
    • Bond – upto $20,000

 

Canada Revenue Agency has the following criteria for disability:

 

1.    Vision

You are blind. You are considered blind if, even with the use of corrective lenses or medication:

  • visual acuity in both eyes is 20/200 (6/60) or less with the Snellen Chart (or an equivalent); or
  • the greatest diameter of the field of vision in both eyes is 20 degrees or less.

 

2.    Walking

You have problems walking (pain, exhaustion, walk slowly because of shortness of breath etc.
You are considered markedly restricted in walking if, all or substantially all the time, you:

  • are unable to walk even with appropriate therapy, medication, and devices; or
  • require an inordinate amount of time to walk, even with appropriate therapy, medication, and devices.

Examples of markedly restricted in walking (examples are not exhaustive):

  • You must always rely on a wheelchair, even for short distances outside of the home, or
  • You can walk 100 metres (or approximately one city block), but only by taking an inordinate amount of time, stopping because of shortness of breath or because of pain, all or substantially all the time, or
  • You experience severe episodes of fatigue, ataxia, lack of coordination, and problems with balance. These episodes cause you to be incapacitated for several days at a time, in that you become unable to walk more than a few steps. Between episodes, you continue to experience the above symptoms, but to a lesser degree. Nevertheless, these less severe symptoms put you at significant risk of injury due to loss of balance, lack of coordination, or falling, and may cause you to require an inordinate amount of time to walk, all or substantially all the time.

Notes

  • Devices for walking include canes, walkers, and other such devices.
  • An inordinate amount of time means that walking takes significantly longer than for an average person who does not have the impairment.

 

3. Speaking

You are considered markedly restricted in speaking if, all or substantially all the time, you:

  • are unable to speak so as to be understood by another person familiar to you, in a quiet setting, even with appropriate therapy, medication, and devices; or
  • take an inordinate amount of time to speak so as to be understood by a person familiar to you, in a quiet setting, even with appropriate therapy, medication, and devices.

Examples of markedly restricted in speaking (examples are not exhaustive):

  • You must rely on other means of communication, such as sign language or a symbol board, all or substantially all the time or
  • You are asked to repeat words and sentences several times, and it takes an inordinate amount of time for you to make yourself understood.

Notes

  • Devices for speaking include tracheoesophageal prostheses, vocal amplification devices, and other such devices.
  • An inordinate amount of time means that speaking so as to be understood takes significantly longer than for an average person who does not have the impairment.

 

4.    Hearing

You are considered markedly restricted in hearing if, all or substantially all the time, you:

  • are unable to hear so as to understand another person familiar to you, in a quiet setting, even with the use of appropriate devices; or

Examples of markedly restricted in hearing (examples are not exhaustive):

  • You must rely completely on lip reading or sign language, despite using a hearing aid, in order to understand a spoken conversation, all or substantially all the time or
  • People raise their voice and repeat words and sentences several times, and it takes an inordinate amount of time for you to understand people, despite the use of a hearing aid.

Notes

  • Devices for hearing include hearing aids, cochlear implants, and other such devices.
  • An inordinate amount of time means that hearing so as to understand takes significantly longer than for an average person who does not have the impairment.

 

5.    Feeding

You are considered markedly restricted in feeding (cooking and / or eating) if, all or substantially all the time, you:

  • are unable to cook food or feed yourself even with appropriate therapy, medication and devices

Examples of markedly restricted in elimination (examples are not exhaustive):

  • Require tube feedings for nutritional sustenance
  • Require an inordinate amount of time to prepare meals or to feed yourself, on a daily basis, due to significant pain and decreased strength and dexterity in the upper limbs.

Notes

  • Feeding oneself does not include identifying, finding, shopping for or otherwise procuring food.
  • Feeding oneself does include preparing food, except when the time associated is related to a dietary restriction or regime, even when the restriction or regime is required due to an illness or health condition.
  • Devices for feeding include modified utensils, and other such devices
  • An inordinate amount of time means that feeding takes three times the normal time required by an average person who does not have the impairment.


 

6.    Dressing

You are considered markedly restricted in dressing if, all or substantially all the time, you:

  • are unable to dress yourself, even with appropriate therapy, medication, and devices; or
  • require an inordinate amount of time to dress yourself, even with appropriate therapy, medication, and devices.

Examples of markedly restricted in dressing (examples are not exhaustive):

  • You cannot dress without daily assistance from another person or
  • Due to pain, stiffness, and decreased dexterity, you require an inordinate amount of time to dress on a daily basis.

Notes

  • Dressing oneself does not include identifying, finding, shopping for or otherwise procuring clothing.
  • Devices for dressing include specialized buttonhooks, long-handled shoehorns, grab rails, safety pulls, and other such devices.
  • An inordinate amount of time means that dressing takes significantly longer than for an average person who does not have the impairment.


 

7.    Bowl movement (bladder or bowel)

You are considered markedly restricted in elimination if, all or substantially all the time, you:

  • are unable to personally manage bowel or bladder functions, even with appropriate therapy, medication, and devices; or
  • require an inordinate amount of time to personally manage bowel or bladder functions, even with appropriate therapy, medication, and devices.

Examples of markedly restricted in elimination (examples are not exhaustive):

  • You need the assistance of another person to empty and tend to your ostomy appliance on a daily basis or
  • You are incontinent of bladder functions, all or substantially all the time, and require an inordinate amount of time to manage and tend to your incontinence pads on a daily basis.

Notes

  • Devices for elimination include catheters, ostomy appliances, and other such devices.
  • An inordinate amount of time means that personally managing elimination takes significantly longer than for an average person who does not have the impairment.


 

8.    Mental functions necessary for everyday life

You are considered markedly restricted in performing the mental functions necessary for everyday life (described below) if, all or substantially all the time, you:

  • are unable to perform them by yourself, even with appropriate therapy, medication, and devices (for example, memory aids and adaptive aids); or
  • require an inordinate amount of time to perform them by yourself, even with appropriate therapy, medication, and devices. An inordinate amount of time means that you take significantly longer than an average person who does not have the impairment.

Mental functions necessary for everyday life include:

  • adaptive functioning (for example, abilities related to self-care, health and safety, abilities to initiate and respond to social interaction and common, simple transactions); or
  • memory (for example, the ability to remember simple instructions, basic personal information such as name and address, or material of importance and interest); and
  • problem-solving, goal-setting, and judgment, taken together (for example, the ability to solve problems, set and keep goals, and make appropriate decisions and judgments).

Important – a restriction in problem-solving, goal-setting, or judgment that markedly restricts adaptive functioning, all or substantially all the time, would qualify.

Examples of markedly restricted in the mental functions necessary for everyday life (examples are not exhaustive):

  • You are unable to leave the house, all or substantially all the time, due to anxiety, despite medication and therapy.
  • You are independent in some aspects of everyday living. However, despite medication and therapy, you need daily support and supervision due to an inability to accurately interpret your environment.
  • You are incapable of making a common, simple transaction without assistance, all or substantially all the time.
  • You experience psychotic episodes several times a year. Given the unpredictability of the psychotic episodes and the other defining symptoms of your impairment (for example, avolition, disorganized behavior and speech), you continue to require daily supervision.
  • You are unable to express needs or anticipate consequences of behavior when interacting with others.

 

9.    A combination of conditions

A combination of conditions 2 to 8 – walking, speaking, hearing, feeding, dressing, bowel movement and mental functions necessary for everyday life which make daily living difficult may also qualify.

Examples of cumulative effects equivalent to being markedly restricted in a basic activity of daily living (examples are not exhaustive) :

  • You can walk for 100 meters, but then must take time to recuperate. You can perform the mental functions necessary for everyday life, but can concentrate on any topic for only a short period of time. The cumulative effect of these two significant restrictions is equivalent to being markedly restricted, such as being unable to perform one of the basic activities of daily living.
  • You always take a long time for walking, dressing and feeding. The extra time it takes to perform these activities, when added together, is equivalent to being markedly restricted, such as taking an inordinate amount of time in a single basic activity of daily living.


 

10. Life-sustaining therapy

You need life-sustaining therapy to support a vital function, even if the therapy has alleviated the symptoms. You need the therapy at least 3 times per week, for an average of at least 14 hours per week.

Examples of life-sustaining therapy (examples are not exhaustive):

  • Chest physiotherapy to facilitate breathing
  • Kidney dialysis to filter blood
  • Insulin therapy to treat Type 1 diabetes in a child who cannot independently adjust the insulin dosage (for 2005 and later years)

Notes
The following points apply in determining the time you spend on therapy:

  • You must dedicate the time for the therapy – that is, you have to take time away from normal, everyday activities to receive it. If you receive therapy by a portable device, such as an insulin pump, or an implanted device, such as a pacemaker, the time the device takes to deliver the therapy does not count towards the 14-hour requirement. However, the time you spend setting up a portable device does count.
  • Do not include activities such as following a dietary restriction or regime, exercising, traveling to receive the therapy, attending medical appointments (other than appointments where the therapy is received), shopping for medication, or recuperating after therapy.

For 2005 and later years

  • If your therapy requires a regular dosage of medication that needs to be adjusted daily, the activities directly related to determining and administering the dosage are considered part of the therapy (for example, monitoring blood glucose levels, preparing and administering the insulin, calibrating necessary equipment, or maintaining a log book of blood glucose levels).
  • Activities that are considered to be part of following a dietary regime, such as carbohydrate calculation, as well as activities related to exercise, do not count toward the 14-hour requirement (even when these activities or regimes are a factor in determining the daily dosage of medication).
  • If a child is unable to perform the activities related to the therapy because of his or her age, the time spent by the child’s primary caregivers performing and supervising these activities can be counted toward the 14-hour requirement. For example, in the case of a child with Type 1 diabetes, supervision includes having to wake the child at night to test his or her blood glucose level, checking the child to determine the need for additional blood glucose testing (during or after physical activity), or other supervisory activities that can reasonably be considered necessary to adjust the dosage of insulin (excluding carbohydrate calculation).


 

For CPP the definition is very different – one must not be able to work now and in the future!!

With different definitions and different agencies involved it is not a surprise that most people who qualify do not avail these benefits. Fear not – We can help. We will do all the work. You only need to provide us with the information that we need.

Call us to book a FREE consultation that may result in you receiving up to $42,000 from the Government. Can there be a better investment of your time? So why wait, pick up the phone now and call us toll free at 1855 786 4786 or email us at: info@DisabilityRefunds.com

List of medical conditions which may make one eligible for Disability benefits

  • Addictions (illegal or prescription meds)
  • ADHD combined type (ADHD-C)
  • ADHD Primarily Hyperactive/Impulsive
  • (ADHD, ADHD-PH/I)
  • ADHD Primarily Inattentive (ADD, ADHD-PI)
  • Agoraphobia (anxiety disorder)
  • Alcoholic (Alcohol Abuse)
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Amputation
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease)
  • Angina
  • Ankle Surgery
  • Anorexia nervosa
  • Anxiety
  • Arthritis
  • Asperger’s syndrome
  • Asthma
  • Ataxia (Cerebellar Dysfunction)
  • Attention Deficit Disorder
  • Auditory Processing Disorder (APD)
  • Autism
  • Auto-Immune Disorder
  • Back Injury
  • Behçet’s disease
  • Bi-polar disorder (mood disorder)
  • Bladder disorder
  • Blood disorder
  • Borderline personality disorder (BPD)
  • Bowel disorder
  • Brain Injury
  • Brain Tumour
  • Broken Bone(s)
  • Bulimia nervosa
  • Cancer
  • Cavus Foot
  • Cerebral Palsy (CP)
  • Celiac Disease
  • Cerebral Haemorrhage
  • Chemical Sensitivities
  • Chromosome Abnormality
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)
  • Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • Chronic pain Disorder
  • Chron’s Disease
  • Cognitive Impairment
  • Colitis
  • Conduct Disorder (CD)
  • Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia
  • Congenital Heart Defect
  • Congestive Heart Failure
  • Coronary artery disease (CAD)
  • Cri-du-Chat syndrome (Deletion 5p Syndrome)
  • Crohn’s disease (Regional Enteritis)
  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Deafness
  • De Vivo Disease (GLUT1 deficiency syndrome)
  • Degenerative Disc Disease
  • Dementia
  • Depression (Clinical, Major, Unipolar)
  • Developmentally Delayed (DD)
  • Dexterity issues
  • Diabetes
  • Diabetes (Type 1)
  • Dissociative Identity Disorder
  • Down Syndrome
  • Dyslexia
  • Dressing
  • (can’t dress or takes significantly longer)
  • Dysgraphia
  • Eating disorder
  • Electrocution
  • Elimination (bowel or bladder functions)
  • Emphysema
  • Epilepsy
  • Failed back syndrome
  • Feeding (can’t feed themselves or takes
  • significantly longer)
  • Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS)
  • Foot Ulcers
  • Fused Wrist
  • Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD)
  • Glaucoma
  • Global Developmental Delay (GDD)
  • Hearing Disorder (unable to hear or takes significantly longer)
  • Hearing Loss
  • Heart Attack
  • Heart Defect
  • Heart Disease
  • Hepatitis C
  • Herniated Discs
  • Hip Injury/pain
  • HIV
  • Huntington’s disease
  • Hypermobility syndrome
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Hypotonia
  • Ileostomy
  • Infantile Spasims (Infant Epilepsy)
  • Intellectual Disability
  • Irritable Bowel syndrome (IBS)
  • Knee injury/pain
  • Learning Disabilities (Special needs)
  • Lumbar Disc Disease
  • Lupus
  • Mania
  • Mental illness
  • Mental Retardation
  • Microcephaly
  • Migraines
  • Mild Intellectual disability (MID)
  • Mood Disorder
  • Motor Vehicle Accident
  • Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
  • Myasthenia Gravis
  • Myotonic Myopathy
  • Nerve Damage
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)
  • Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD)
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Panic Disorder
  • Paralysation
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Personality disorder
  • Pervasive developmental disorder (PDD)
  • Polycystic Kidney Disease
  • Post-Polio Syndrome
  • Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS)
  • Psychotic
  • Quadrapallegic
  • Retinoschisis
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Schizophrenia
  • Scoliosis
  • Seizure Disorder
  • Selective Mutism
  • Sleep Apnea
  • Sleep disorder
  • Social Anxiety Disorder
  • Soft Tissue Damage
  • Spastic Paresis
  • Speech disorder (unable to speak or takes significantly longer)
  • Specific developmental disorder (SDD)
  • Spinal disorder
  • Spinal injury/pain
  • Spinal stenosis
  • Stroke
  • Substance Abuse
  • Tic disorder
  • Tourette syndrome
  • Trigeminal Neuralgia
  • Tumor
  • Vision (Blind in BOTH eyes, 20/200, 20 degrees field of vision)
  • Walking (can’t walk 100 metres or takes significantly longer)